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New Ross County captain Iain Vigurs looks to set example


By Andrew Henderson

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Iain Vigurs wants to lead by example after taking over as Ross County captain.

Picture - Ken Macpherson, Inverness.
See story.
Ross County's Iain Vigurs was amongst the afternoon group of first-team players and staff to return to training yesterday (Thurs) confined to a closed-off area within the club's training ground.
Ross County manager Stuart Kettlewell was joined bynew assistant manager Richie Brittain and new club coach Don Cowie, as well as sports scientist Liam Dukes. They were under strict orders to maintain a two-metre distance at all times.
Picture - Ken Macpherson, Inverness. See story. Ross County's Iain Vigurs was amongst the afternoon group of first-team players and staff to return to training yesterday (Thurs) confined to a closed-off area within the club's training ground. Ross County manager Stuart Kettlewell was joined bynew assistant manager Richie Brittain and new club coach Don Cowie, as well as sports scientist Liam Dukes. They were under strict orders to maintain a two-metre distance at all times.

The 32-year-old has been handed the armband after former skipper Marcus Fraser left the club earlier this summer, with Callum Morris being appointed vice-captain.

Vigurs is in his second spell in Dingwall, having made over 200 appearances in all competitions in total.

He has been part of two separate Staggies squads that got promoted to the top flight, so he knows what it takes to win, and among other things it is that mentality he wants to instil in his team-mates.

“I’m absolutely buzzing – it’s a real honour, and it’s one that I could definitely not turn down,” Vigurs said.

“First and foremost a captain needs to lead by example, there’s no doubt about that.

“I think I will encourage people all round, but if people are not quite on it for whatever reason, then I’m going to have to be there to pick them up.

“I’ve always been of the mind that once you cross that white line, everyone should be a captain.

“It’s not instilled in everyone, but I think most people should have some of those leadership qualities and that pride not to be beaten on the pitch.

“We need to bring a winning mentality back up to the Highlands.”

Vigurs hopes to have an impact off the pitch as well as on it though.

The midfielder has had time to reflect while sidelined with injury in recent seasons, and then again when sport was shut down due to the pandemic, and he feels he could have achieved more over the course of his career.

There are one or two choices he has made where, given the opportunity, Vigurs might elect to send himself down a different path with the benefit of hindsight.

So he believes that those experiences could come in just as valuably in his new role.

“It’s a question that I’ve been asking myself for the last couple of years,” he said.

“You get to 30 or 31 years old, and you start to realise what you could have done in the game, and what you haven’t done in the game.

“Looking back, I have maybe made a couple of decision that I shouldn’t have done. Now, being a captain, I need to show younger
players how to lead by example.

“To be fair, I think a lot of the boys at the club
have good heads on their shoulders, so I can’t see them making any bad
choices in their career, but if I can help them in any way, I’m more than happy to do that.

“Firstly I have to do the right things on the park for them to follow suit. I try not to look back with regrets, all I can do now is push on and try to help others.”

If the play maker needs any advice himself, obvious mentors are County’s coaches – Stuart Kettlewell, Richie Brittain and Don Cowie.

“To lean on guys that you played with and have known for so long is a massive help,” Vigurs added.

“The gaffer has shown his trust in me, which is massive. That alone gives you confidence for the new season.

“Having the other guys there for support is really good. They know the identity of the club, they know what it means to play for Ross County and to be at Ross County.

“I think we all want to move in the same direction going forward.”


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