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Reflections from Ross-shire: 100, 50 and 25 years ago


By Hector MacKenzie


Primary Pupils Room 7,2B and 3B.Late 1940s. Picture courtesy of Dingwall Museum
Primary Pupils Room 7,2B and 3B.Late 1940s. Picture courtesy of Dingwall Museum

100 Years Ago

Friday, August 15, 1919

ON Thursday morning the 1st Cameron Highlanders left the Invergordon camp for their station in India. Shortly after midnight they marched – about 800 strong – to the Station, where two special trains were in readiness to convey them, to Glasgow, their port of embarkation.

Mr Andrew Carnegie, of whom here in the North we spoke somewhat parochially as the Laird of Skibo, died on Monday in America in his 85th year. Mr Carnegie's life from the day he left Dunfermline in his twelfth year, and worked as bobbin boy in an American factory on landing in the United States, until the day of his death is one ceaseless romance.

The moors and forests in Ross-shire are as fully occupied this year as they were in August, 1913. In this area grouse shooing invariably makes a late start. Few guns were out on the 12th. Birds were strong and healthy, but bags were light. The weather was excellent.

Colonel and Lady Goldsmith have the Inverewe fishing and shooting for the season and are resident at Poolewe Hotel. Considering the inclement weather they are having fair sport on Fieon Loch. Lord and Lady Mackenzie are in Inveran Lodge. His Lordship is having good sport on the Ewe and Loch Maree.

50 Years Ago

Friday, August 15, 1969

THUNDER, lightning and torrential rain on Saturday night and Sunday morning followed one of the hottest weeks of the year. It made for a miserable week-end for the thousands of campers scattered throughout the Highlands in this record breaking tourist month. In Dingwall there was flooding in the Boggan and West-end areas, always the danger spots in

such weather.

In the country districts, standing crops were badly flattened. Since Monday warm, sultry conditions have prevailed, and judging by the crowds thronging Dingwall High Street, there is no abatement in the number of visitors to the North.

Four Ross-shire soldiers are taking part in the Edinburgh Military Tattoo, which commences this week. They are:- 1st Bn. Queen's Own Highlanders – Bandsman Lachlan Campbell, 20 Fyrish Crescent, Evanton, and Pte. Bryan Macdonald, 46, St Andrew's Road, Tain. Gordon Barracks, Bridge of Don – Pte. Sandy Matheson, 6 West Terrace, Ullapool. 1st Bn. Gordon Highlanders – Pte. Norman Wood, Alcaig.

25 Years Ago

Friday, August 12, 1994

ROSS County made their historic debut in the higher grade of Scottish League football on Wednesday, commanding opening night centre stage as the main bill of the 1994-95 season got underway.

With a crowd safety limit of 3,000 pending total completion of the new terracings, eager supporters came in droves from all part of Ross and Cromarty and beyond to a refurbished Victoria Park for County's first game as a senior club, a fixture that seemed to have captured the imagination of the entire football public of Scotland – a 1st round Coca Cola Cup match in which newcomers Ross County were coincidentally drawn against Queen's Park, the oldest club in Scotland.Brian Grant (2) and Jamie MacPherson scored for County in a 3-2 win.

The Prince of Wales is to visit award-winning Cromarty at the end of next month following an invitation by Cromarty Courthouse Museum curator David Alston.

In April, when Prince Charles backed the launch of a new architectural magazine Perspectives, Mr Alston wrote to him asking if he would consider a visit.



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