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Iconic Belfast shipbuilder Harland & Wolff holds its first Highland careers fair in Ross-shire


By Calum MacLeod

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Founded in Belfast 160 years ago, Harland & Wolff now operates multiple sites, including ARnish in the Western Isles and Methil in Fife. Photography by davidcordner.com
Founded in Belfast 160 years ago, Harland & Wolff now operates multiple sites, including ARnish in the Western Isles and Methil in Fife. Photography by davidcordner.com

One of the most famous names in shipbuilding, Harland & Wolff, is to host its first Inverness-Nigg Careers’ Evening in Alness.

Taking place at the Alness Heritage Centre this evening, Friday January 21, from 4pm to 8pm, it will also provide an opportunity to meet existing Harland & Wolff employees who can share their experiences of working with the Belfast-based brand whose shipbuilding heritage includes the Titanic, SS Canberra and HMS Belfast.

This event comes as 17 wind farm projects have been given the green light, leading to a multi-billion pound investment into the Scottish wind farm fabrication supply chain and follows Harland & Wolff’s acquisition last year of the former BiFab fabrication yards at Methil in Fife and Arnish on the Isle of Lewis.

These facilities will focus on fabrication work within the renewable, energy and defence sectors.

Prospective employees can register to attend by visiting harland-wolff.com/careersopenday

Harland & Wolff is a multisite fabrication company, operating in the maritime and offshore industry through five markets: commercial, cruise and ferry, defence, energy and renewables and six services: technical services, fabrication and construction, decommissioning, repair and maintenance, in-service support and conversion.

Its Belfast yard is one of Europe’s largest heavy engineering facilities, with deep water access, two of Europe’s largest drydocks, ample quayside and vast fabrication halls.


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