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Charity shop appeal: Snap up vintage delights, high-value treasures and sought-after collectibles to help British Heart Foundation; Shoppers challenged to snap up 'pre-loved' gift to fund life-saving research and reduce waste


By Hector MacKenzie

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Some of the bargains available for the sharp-eyed shopper.
Some of the bargains available for the sharp-eyed shopper.

WITH a different Christmas ahead for many of us, the British Heart Foundation (BHF) is asking people in Scotland to shop a little differently this year by buying at least one 'pre-loved' gift from a charity shop, whether it’s online or in store.

The charity is challenging shoppers in Scotland to find one of a kind gifts in their shops and eBay store to help consumers reduce waste and save money this Christmas. By giving donated items a new lease of life, shoppers will also help the BHF in its recovery from the coronavirus crisis.

BHF shops are filled to the brim with rare and unique finds at affordable prices - from books and accessories to designer clothes and retro glassware. If you’d rather stay at home, you can now also find an array of preloved gifts for fashion lovers on the BHF’s recently launched Depop page.

If you’re on the hunt for something extra special to put a smile on a loved one’s face, you can also try the BHF’s eBay shop which offers antique watches, vintage jewellery and signed memorabilia.

With 120,000 items sold each year, it’s the perfect place to find high value treasures and sought-after collectables that can make truly unique and personal gifts.

The BHF hopes its treasure trove of secondhand giftware will inspire people in Scotland to give more thoughtfully this Christmas while also saving items from going to waste. Last year alone, the BHF helped save some 71,000 tonnes of items from landfill and prevented 135,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions from being released into the atmosphere.

The Covid-19 crisis has had a devastating impact on the BHF’s income, cutting its research funding in half and putting future life saving discoveries at risk. The charity is urgently appealing for support this Christmas and hopes the Charity Shop Challenge will help raise vital funds at a time when hearts need help more than ever.

Carefully considered old-school gifts can mean so much more– while helping fund life-saving research and reducing waste.
Carefully considered old-school gifts can mean so much more– while helping fund life-saving research and reducing waste.

Allison Swaine-Hughes, retail director at the British Heart Foundation, said: “If you’re looking to celebrate Christmas a bit differently this year, our Charity Shop Challenge will help you think outside the box when it comes to your festive shopping. Our high street shops and eBay and Depop stores are packed with countless unique treasures waiting to be discovered, making your gifts all the more meaningful this year. There are also plenty of good quality furniture and homewares on offer too, if you’re giving your home a festive spruce.

“Every pound raised in our shops and online stores help us support the 720,000 people living with heart and circulatory diseases across Scotland, many of whom are at increased risk from Covid-19. Now more than ever, we urgently need your support this Christmas so we can continue funding life saving breakthroughs.”

All of the BHF’s 76 shops and stores in Scotland are now back up and running, with measures in place to keep staff, volunteers and customers safe.

To get involved in the BHF’s Charity Shop Challenge, simply head to your nearest store or browse the BHF eBay shop for unique and affordable gifts. You can also share your finds on social media using the hashtag #BoughtAtBHF.

To find your nearest shop please visit: bhf.org.uk/shop

What's your best-ever charity shop find?



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