Home   News   Article

Festive flashback to Ross-shire in days gone by


By Philip Murray

Get the Ross-shire Journal sent to your inbox every week and swipe through an exact replica of the day's newspaper



Loch Droma. Wester Ross was hit by heavy snow in December 1981. Picture: Philip Murray.
Loch Droma. Wester Ross was hit by heavy snow in December 1981. Picture: Philip Murray.

HEAVY snows, festive letters to Santa from across the Highlands, and continued excitement over the first modern Nessie sightings – reporter Philip Murray has looked at the archives to see what was making headlines in decades past.

1981

HEAVY SNOW IN WEST:

As the Inverness area became colder and colder, certain parts of Wester Ross and Lochaber received the full weight of the snow falls which presumably had to come.

More than seven inches fell in the Achnasheen and Ullapool areas of Wester Ross and, between Fort Augustus and Fort William, almost four inches fell within one hour during the afternoon.

But with snow clearing teams in constant action, the only road reported blocked last night was near Tongue in Sutherland and that was only because a car driver had got into difficulties and abandoned his vehicle.

We are informed one of the gang thrust his hand into the pocket of a poor man, and extracted the only half-a crown it contained. One of these parties has been frequently seen in Dingwall - Report from 1844

1958

OVER 600 LETTERS TO SANTA AT CAFÉ:

Once again hundreds of letters to Santa Claus have arrived in the post box in the Fairyland Café, in the Playhouse Cinema, Inverness, and Santa, with the help of Mr Nairn, cinema manager, and a few of his assistants, have answered the letters, and assured many children that there is a Santa Claus.

This year, over 600 letters have been received, from as far north as the Orkneys, and as far south as Fife, and requests vary from guitars to hula hoops.

1933

LOCH NESS ‘MONSTER’: Still Exciting Curiosity of the World:

The Loch Ness monster continues to excite curiosity far beyond the confines of Inverness-shire. In many Continental countries it is the subject of articles in the Press, and we have received cuttings from German newspapers which reveal that the monster’s appearances and its identity are being widely discussed.

Among the arrivals at Inverness yesterday was the London editor of the famous French newspaper Le Matin, who stated that in France a lively interest is being taken in the mysterious creature which has been seen so often in Loch Ness.

1858

JUVENILE TEETOTALISM:

A total abstinence institution has been for some time in operation in Dingwall at which instruction in vocal and instrumental music is given. About 150 young people congregate every fortnight. It is hoped an undertaking so praiseworthy will receive support.

1844

SUSPICIOUS CHARACTERS:

We learn there are at present several young and able-bodied fellows traversing different parts of Ross-shire, under pretext of buying hare and rabbit skins, and when practicable, offering some commonality in exchange. Their appearance is calculated to excite suspicion as to their intentions. We are informed one of the gang thrust his hand into the pocket of a poor man, and extracted the only half-a crown it contained. One of these parties has been frequently seen in Dingwall.


Do you want to respond to this article? If so, click here to submit your thoughts and they may be published in print.


Get a digital copy of the Ross-shire Journal delivered straight to your inbox every week allowing you to swipe through an exact replica of the day's newspaper - it looks just like it does in print!

SUBSCRIBE NOW


This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More